Sales Training

This page is a database of articles and downloadable white papers on many different aspects of sales training. You can search for any particular topic (e.g. "cold-calling") by typing it into the search box above the list of contents to the right. If you use the productivity tools in Connect (Calendar, Contacts, Workshop, Dashboard) you can use your dashboard results to see which areas of selling you have the most weak spots and then come to this page to find training resources to help you improve.

Closing The Sale More 2010

CLOSING THE SALE
Finding new prospects and explaining features and benefits can be difficult for a salesperson who isn’t close-oriented. But inexperience can be crushing when it comes time to close the sale.

CLOSE FROM THE BEGINNING
Don't confuse this idea with the hard sell; this aggressive approach alienates many potential customers. Instead, explain your agenda. Tell the prospect exactly what you're selling and how it can benefit their business. Being up front about your intentions promotes an honest, mutually respectful, and rewarding discussion leading the way for a smooth close.

“The ultimate goal of any sales presentation is closing the sale. The close is normally the culminating stage of the sales process the point at which the prospect decides whether or not they will buy. Inexperienced salespeople often wonder when it is appropriate to try to close the sale.”

LEARN TO RECOGNIZE WHEN PEOPLE ARE READY TO BUY
A customer might indicate they're ready by asking questions about the product or the buying process: "How long would it take to get the ad to air?" "Is the production of my ad free?" or "Can my kids be in the ad?" Other good signs include complaints about your radio competitors.

DON’T RESPOND TO QUESTIONS WITH A MERE YES OR NO
Answer your prospect's queries with questions of your own. Carefully chosen, these return questions can help lead to a sale.

For example, instead of answering the question, "Can I have ads that come in 30 secs?” you should say, "Would you like your ads to be 30 secs long?”

FREE TRIALS OFTEN LEAD TO SALES
This strategy works well for all sorts of businesses a month of airtime perhaps; Internet ads on your website, where there are often free 30-day trials there are sales to be found.

SUGGEST SPECIFIC TERMS
Rather than asking whether your prospect wants to buy, suggest a specific buying scenario and then ask if your customer agrees to it. For example, "We can get you to air on Tuesday for $10,000. Do you want us to do that?" addresses three separate questions: the number of ads and frequency, the full price of the campaign, and the specific time the ads will go to air.

If your prospect is uncomfortable with any of the specifics - for example, he wants to advertise Monday - he will say so. You've offered him a chance to let you make decisions about details that otherwise would delay a sale. But be sure you know enough about your customers' needs to make reasonable suggestions.

Click here to download a hard copy of these first sixteen tips.

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Sales Training